Cherries

About Cherries

Cherries were first cultivated around 70 BC in present day Armenia.  They are a difficult tree to grow and keep alive and have a lot of pests.  Because of this, non-organic cherries are typically heavily sprayed with pesticides.  Turkey and the United States are the top 2 producers of cherries in the world.  There are 2 primary varieties of cherries: sweet (e.g. bing) and tart (aka sour cherries).  Sweet cherries are typically the cherries we eat raw and tart cherries are typically the cherries we use when cooking.

Nutrition Benefits of Cherries

Cherries contain antioxidants – in particular anthocyanins and cyanidin.  They are known for helping with sleep (melatonin), arthritis / pain relief, reducing belly fat, lowering risk of stroke, inflammation, and reducing risk of gout.

Smoothie Tip

Buy frozen cherries.  It’s way cheaper and easier than pitting and storing fresh cherries to use in smoothies!

If you are using fresh cherries, be sure to pit them.  Blenders don’t do well with the pits.

Nutrition Facts

Always discuss
with your doctor

This information is not meant to replace your doctor, but to work in tandem with your doctor’s advice. This website makes it easy for you and your doctor to select the best foods and the best smoothie recipes that you should be eating.

My Nutrition Advisor does not diagnose, cure, or treat disease.

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Recipe

Cherries scores well for 11 health goals

This ingredient was scored for various health goals Learn more.

The Research

Gout: Score 100

Summary:

Human: Cherries lower plasma urate in healthy women, indicating its potential value in the treatment of gout. Cherry consumption decreases risk of recurrent gout attacks.

References:
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Inflammation: Score 100

Summary:

Human: Cherries reduce inflammation. Cherries significantly lowered systemic inflammatory and oxidative stress induced by a series of metabolically challenging cycling bouts. They lower circulating concentrations of markers for chronic inflammatory diseases in healthy humans. Animal: Cherries have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. They suppress inflammation induced pain as effectively as indomethacin.

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Arthritis (Osteo): Score 96

Summary:

Cherries reduce inflammation.

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Athletic Performance: Score 92

Summary:

Cherries can reduce inflammation and accelerate recovery. They also minimize post exercise pain.

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Fat Loss: Score 92

Summary:

Human: Cherries appear to positively alter a number of abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Animal: Cherrie intake alters abdominal fat, fat gene transcription and inflammation in obesity prone rats fed a high fat diet.

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Pain: Score 92

Summary:

Human: Cherries reduce inflammation.

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Diabetes (Type 2): Score 90

Summary:

Human: Cherries positively alter a number of abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, in human studies.

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Circulatory System (Cardiovascular): Score 86

Summary:

Cherries have cardioprotective properties.

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Erectile Dysfunction: Score 86

Summary:

Cherries have cardioprotective properties.

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Cancer: Score 84

Summary:

In Vitro: Cherries have antioxidant and anticancer activity. It inhibits colon cancer cell tumor development and proliferation. It has anti-tumor potential against colon cancer cells.

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Cholesterol: Score 84

Summary:

Cherry inhibits lipid peroxidation.

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How Our Scoring System Works

For each health goal, we assigned a score to each recipe and each ingredient. This helps you better understand the correlation that medical research is suggesting between foods and benefits to various health goals. Our scoring system is based on REAL RESEARCH published on pubmed.gov. This is a website that curates over 25 million different biomedical journals.

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What we consider when creating your scores:

  • 1Type of Study (human, animal, lab, or academic review)
  • 2Amount of Research
  • 3What the Research Says
  • 4How much of the ingredient we use (for the recipes)
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